Showing posts with label Fun. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Fun. Show all posts

22.1.23

Celebrating the Lunar New Year of the Rabbit: On an Outing to the Metropolitan Museum of Art

In this post, I write about how I celebrated Lunar New Year and saw a rabbit, listened to a Mandarin-speaking docent talk about silver sculptures of the Buddha and watched an interactive dragon dance performance in the Great Hall.
A blue dragon dances in line at the Great Hall in the Metropolitan Museum of Art
A dragon dancer joins the line in the Great Hall at the Metropolitan Museum of Art 
A troupe of dragon dancers from the Chinese Center on Long Island get ready to perform.
Dragon Dancers
from Long Island
As we said goodbye to one year and welcomed another, I celebrated Lunar New Year with @juky_chen. From stunning works of art depicting classic examples of the rabbit to drums and a dragon 🐲 dance, it was a truly unique experience that I’ll never forget.

My journey began with exploring some incredible pieces on display of porcelain and jade works depicting the rabbit. In galleries 208 and 211, a Mandarin-speaking docent spoke about different sculptures of the Buddha carved out of silver. Only sixteen examples of this Buddha exist, and the museum owns two. The highlight for me was seeing firsthand how much detail went into each item — something that can get lost in photographs or videos. It made me appreciate more just how much work went into creating them!
A Metropolitan Museum of Art docent talks about a sculpture of Buddha in gallery 208 and 211.
A museum docent talks about a
16th-century Buddha sculpture from China.

Next up were several interactive exhibits focusing on different aspects of Lunar New Year celebrations, including the dragon dance in the Great Hall, kids dressed traditionally, music performances, and much more. It felt like being part of something special as the museum filled with festive joy while everyone got involved in what they saw before them — all while learning more about this important holiday’s cultural background.

Finally, I ended my day by visiting the gift shop, where I found many items related to Lunar New Year festivities, such as fans, banners for decoration, and all sorts of memorabilia perfect for taking home as souvenirs or decorations for future years' celebrations!
A Met Teen volunteers for the 2023 Lunar New Year event.
Overall it had been an unforgettable day full of discoveries that will stay with me forever — it reminded me why museums are so important: without their presence, these precious memories would disappear over time, leaving us none wiser than when we arrived!

4.5.22

Photo Gallery & Story: Em and Orange and the Rubik's Cube

In this post, I tell an imaginative story about two boys and a Rubik's Cub.
Two boys hold their respective Rubik's cubes.
       Once upon a time there were two boys, one from the east side of the railroad tracks and one from the west side. Though they were born in different worlds, fate had other plans for them. The boy from the east was named Orange, a bright and ambitious young man with dreams of being an engineer someday. He worked hard to make his parents proud, but he still felt like something was missing in his life. On the other side of town was another boy named Em, who lived on the west side of town near where the railroad tracks ended at a small station house. Em grew up without much money or resources, but he did have big dreams, too; he wanted to become a famous musician one day. One day, after school let out for summer break, Orange decided to take an adventurous journey down the railroad tracks that divided their towns' east and west sides. As fate would have it, Em happened to be walking along that same section of track when Orange came across him by chance. After introducing themselves, they quickly became friends despite coming from two very different backgrounds — both offering knowledge and guidance and sharing stories about living life on their own terms despite all odds stacked against him.
     Together they explored each others' worlds as if no boundaries existed between them — exploring neighborhoods on either side of town together and sharing music, which brought joyous laughter throughout their days spent together until eventually, it seemed as if no separation between them ever really existed at all!
Orange and Em had a love for the Rubik's cube. They would spend endless hours searching for different kids at the dollar store. On lazy Saturdays, following the train tracks to the end of town, near an old lake, with a browned-out beach, they would try to solve the cubes. Orange and Em were determined to master the cube and use it as an opportunity to learn more about each other and bridge any gaps between them. As they work together, both of them discover that there is much more that unites them than divides them.
The Rubik's Cube has been a popular and beloved puzzle since it was first invented by Hungarian sculptor and professor Ernö Rubik in 1974. Since then, the cube has become even more popular, with over 350 million units sold worldwide. The cube is thought to be the best-selling toy of all time. Its unique combination of colors, shapes, and difficulty levels is believed to be responsible for its continued success today. The history of the Rubik's Cube includes some fascinating scientific developments that make this classic puzzle one of the most challenging puzzles ever created!
Some people find this puzzle challenging due to its complexity, as it often involves solving multiple steps or components to arrive at the correct answer. Others may have more experience with puzzles of this type and can quickly recognize patterns and apply strategies that help them solve the problem. Additionally, some individuals may possess innate intellectual abilities which allow them to intuitively identify solutions that others may not think of.
Solving a Rubik's cube requires combining cognitive skills, including spatial awareness and pattern recognition. While some individuals may have an innate aptitude for these abilities, scientific theories suggest that other factors, such as practice, experience, and focus can also affect the ability to solve a Rubik's cube. Research has found that people with higher levels of abstract thinking are more capable of understanding the patterns involved in solving a Rubik's cube. Additionally, problem-solving strategies play an essential role in improving performance on this task; however, different techniques work better for specific individuals depending on their particular skill set. Ultimately, it is likely that there is no single answer to what makes solving a Rubik's cube easier or more challenging - instead it depends heavily upon the individual's unique mix of cognitive skills and strategies when approaching the puzzle.
So, when Orange and Em, two boys who learned to take on the same challenge in different ways, a lesson was learned. Em approaches the cube with determination, methodically studying each piece and trying to fit them together as quickly as possible. His fast-paced approach leads to some initial success, but eventually he gets stuck - unable to move any further forward or backward. Orange takes a slower, more creative approach, viewing the cube from different angles and experimenting with unique strategies that might work better for him. He starts out slowly but gradually builds momentum until he can see small progress every time he turns it over. In the end, both boys can solve the cube using their own methods - patience combined with creativity enabling them to find success where previously there had been only frustration. 
Through this story, we learn that problem-solving doesn't always have one correct answer - depending on our circumstances and abilities, different approaches may be necessary to achieve our goals.
Having an open mind when approaching any challenge is essential as it allows one to be more creative and think outside the box. An open-minded approach encourages the consideration of multiple perspectives and ideas, which can often lead to innovative solutions that may not have been considered before. Additionally, by being open-minded, we are less likely to become stuck in a rut or fall into tunnel vision, thus allowing us to see opportunities for growth and improvement that otherwise would have remained hidden. Having an open mindset also will enable us to become more adaptable and better equipped for change — essential skills for anyone who wishes to overcome obstacles or achieve success in any field.

24.4.20

Video: How To Make Potato Salad The Way My Mother Taught Me

First Steps To Make Potato Salad
Good morning, today I am going to show you how to make my famous potato salad. You're gonna want to cut up some green onions, real good. And you're gonna need a jar or two of mayonnaise. I like to boil my eggs first. When you're boiling your eggs one nice tip is to take the eggs out on a spoon and if the water evaporates then the egg is ready. Similarly, with my potatoes, I boil "em for twenty to twenty-five minutes.

Cutting Up All My Ingredients
In the meantime, I am cutting up my green onions — I love the ones with the bulbs at the end. They are so delicious. A good potato salad has celery. Celery is going to give your potato salad some texture — something to chew on and it just tastes good. Going back to my potatoes — that takes the longest time. I keep the skins on 'em. Because I like to eat the skins. But after you boil 'em, if you want, you can take the skins off. It's up to you. Look at that boil. My favorite part is deshelling my hard-boiled eggs. I'm pretty good at it. And you'll get the hang of it too. Today, I bought some brown eggs but any eggs will suffice. Quick fact: eggs are an alchemist's dream in the kitchen. Eggs are perfect for any meal. Ohhh. Just look at that white orb of deliciousness. Cannot wait to cut you up and put you in my salad, honey.

Pot-'O-Potatoes
Alright. Those potatoes are ready. * To show you I got some turkey bacon but really any hog bacon will work just as fine. I guess I'm feeling a little health-conscious. So I bought some turkey bacon. And I fry that up in some olive oil. Crispy-like. You want to make that stuff crunchy. Cuz when you put it in your potato salad — Mmmmm — it's going to give it that — Ohhhhhhhhh — nice, fatty taste that you love. We don't call it comfort food for nothing.

Masher-cize
And here's where the elbow grease comes in. You're going to have to mash those potatoes. I got myself a masher. I don't know if it's ready for potatoes. But it works. Mash those potatoes good. Cut 'em up. Now. If you are like me you don't want your potatoes too mashed. You want to keep some chunk in there. Now when I'm getting ready to mix everything up I do add a little bit of mustard. It tastes good. You don't want to put too much mustard in it. And you're going to mix that mayonnaise inside and you're going to mash it all up. You're going to put your eggs in there. You're going to put your celery in the bowl.

Finishing Touches
Now, you don't want to leave out an important ingredient — black pepper. Not too much. But enough to make it taste good. And there you have it. My momma's favorite potato salad recipe served at your doorstep. Well just kidding. You'll have to make it yourself. But I think I have enough comfort food to last me a month. So let me know if you try out my potato salad recipe and how it works out for you. I'm going to eat this up, honey. Yes!

25.1.20

Self-Portrait in a Instagram-Laced Painterly Palette

In this post, I took a ton of painterly-style Instagram selfies and I talk about how we never understand each other well - in most circumstances. Understanding others is hard. But worth it.
A collage of Greig Roselli in a blue parka
     There is a moment in the new HBO comedy series "Mrs. Fletcher" where a young, white college kid sits at the lunch table with several guys he assumes are "just like him". The guys are talking about climate change in a thoughtful, meaningful way and the young, white college kid makes a joke about riding a surfboard on a tsunami wave. He's looking for laughs but he misses the cue. He assumes that people who look like him and dress like him will, in turn, have the same mindset as him. 
      I have come to find out that the biggest mistake one can make is to assume that another person thinks the same way that you do. And even if another person thinks similarly to you, or dresses similarly to you, it is the worst mistake possible, to consider that other person you. It is harder to make yourself known to another person, to a friend, a lover, or whatever. It is hard because it means you have to begin to understand the other person first and they have to begin to understand you.  

31.12.19

Thinking About the Roman God Janus On New Year’s Eve

The Roman god Janus as depicted on an ancient coin.
New and old faces to anticipate the new year.
     The Romans had a god named Janus. He had two faces - one looking backward into the past and the other looking forward into the future. For me, the New Year represents this paradoxical view - looking forward and 👀 looking back.
To be Janus-faced is to face this contradiction.
     And this time of year it’s customary to reflect on a year gone by and to make resolve for the upcoming annual. Now whether you assert that the 2010s are for sure done with or not (yes, there is a controversy about this) - I feel like a new decade has begun (and I’m anticipating a ton of jokes about 20/20 vision and Barbara Walters).
Faces - familiar and novel - to ring in a new year.
Stray Comments On New Year’s Resolutions for 2020
  • I want to walk more. That means 10,000 steps a day.
  • Read more books this year.
  • Write every day.
  • To remember my resolutions throughout the year (but wait - I don’t recall last year’s resolutions!)

21.5.19

May Teacher Journal: Teacher Gonna Teach Animated GIF

Teacher Gonna Teach GIF
Teacher Gonna Teach
So, I wanted to make an animated GIF to represent teaching in May - and here it is (see above).

18.7.17

The Man is Lightheaded

We put our hands in the air.

And no. I didn't photoshop out his face. The shot came out this way.

Electric lightbulb dance factory!

2.11.10

Analysis: Freud, Derrida and the Magic Slate

Do you remember playing with a magic slate as a child? Learn how Sigmund Freud uses this device to talk about the unconscious mind.
Do you remember this toy from your childhood? It’s charmingly called a “Magic Slate” or an “Etch-a-Sketch”. In German, the Wunderblock. I had a version of this toy as a kid. The novelty of the apparatus consists in the ability of the pad to retain impressions, such as drawings, and like a normal slate, the impressions can be erased, but not by an eraser but by simply lifting the page. Presto. Freud and Derrida loved this thing. Freud liked it because the Magic Slate is a model for the human mind. Psychoanalysis! Derrida liked it because Freud's reading of it seems to suggest the unconscious is inhabited by writing and is prior to speech acts. Deconstruction!
Deconstruction!
The stylus is used to write, scribble, or draw on the transparent plastic sheaf which creates an impression on the middle thin layer. The magic slate I had as a kid was a simple plastic, red stylus. The slate itself was a flimsy plastic backing with the “magic sheaf” part lightly affixed to the backing.

When the sheaf is lifted, the thin papery layer which exists beneath it is erased of its impression. At the bottom, a resinous wax layer exists which retains etched into the resin the residuals, or traces of all the previous impressions.

Freud on the “Magic Slate”
Freud wrote a short seven-page essay called "A Note Upon The Mystic Writing Pad." He wrote the essay to explain his theory of memory via the working apparatus of the Wunderblock. The outer coating represents the protective layer of the mind. The layer protects the mind from too much excitation. Notice if the thin paper layer is torn or contaminated the Wunderblock ceases to work in the same way that trauma can irreparably damage the psyche. The stylus represents a stimulus from the outside world. The papery layer is the conscious mind and the wax resin is representative of the unconscious.

The memory of the present can be erased, but like the mind, retains the impressions in the unconscious. The Wunderblock can both destroy and create.

Freud thought the Magic Slate was the closest machine-toy resembling the human mind. The only difference between the Wunderblock and the human mind is the mind's waxy resin layer can come back and disrupt the psychic life. Notably in dreams and trauma.

Derrida On Freud
Derrida, in an essay called "Freud and the Scene of Writing" was astounded that Freud, as a metaphysical thinker, could have inadvertently stumbled upon a machine that is a metaphor for the techné (production) of memory.

Derrida wonders how Freud could have imagined the Wunderblock to represent the psychic life while not realizing that the fundamental essence of the toy, like the mind, is its reserve of graphical traces, not phonetic signifiers.

29.9.10

Comic Book Shop in Manhattan: Forbidden Planet

Image result for "forbidden planet" manhattan
Forbidden Planet is a cool shop to browse and window shop. You never know when you'll come across a cool Star Wars action figure or colorful graphic novel. FYI: Management holds your backpack while you browse. Check out the Strand next door. 
Where: on Broadway near Union Square 14th Street (Subway lines: 4, 5, 6, N, Q, R).

13.8.10

Poem for a Phlebotomist's Office (Or, a Public Service Announcement for Donating Blood)

I present you with a poem to be read out-loud at your next visit to get your blood drawn.
Poem about getting your blood drawn
Read this poem when you get your blood taken.




Hey, it's just
blood being drawn,
dahlin' - no cry!

So, no sweat, boo -

What else you gonna do?

Sit back, relax, let
the trained phlebotomist do
her act! - 1, 2, 3

then you're done, hon! YAY!

At least it ain't no vaccine!

So get your snack on later and be serene

Wasn't it a "walk in the park?"!

20.2.10

New Orleans Park on the River: "The Fly"

In this post, I write about a favorite New Orleans drinking spot, crayfish eating spot, and park - The Fly.
A Google Maps Satellite Image of the Fly
Behind Audubon Park lies what locals call the "Fly." The park is a green space alongside the Mississippi River near the Riverbend and the park's terminus. My friend M. Introduced me to it. She was like, "You can take someone down to the fly, murder 'em, throw 'em in the water, and no one would ever know!" The fly is located beyond the levee near the Corps of Engineers headquarters and Children's hospital. An informer detailed an event she witnesses at the Fly. A woman in her mid-forties walked into the river's shore and popped a squat and let loose nature's rain. It was seen by one except the unlucky few who had sat on the Fly's inconspicuous rocky steps enwrapped in wire mesh. One other cool thing about the Fly is its perfect vantage point for watching international cargo ships parade by. One usually does not notice the city's ship traffic because of levy obstruction.