27.2.21

Paint Night: We Did Van Gogh's Sunflowers

I’m no Van Gogh. I have both 👂. But I love a good communal 🎨. With my collegial krewe, we paint and pass the time.

12.2.21

It’s Lunar New Year 2021 — Drink a Bubble Tea and Rejoice

Lunar New Year in 2021 at Garden School in Jackson Heights, New York City
Me, vibing, with bubble tea — a New Year's gift from a fellow teacher.

It's a new year in the Lunar East Asian Calendar. Shout out to friends in mainland China 🇨🇳, Taiwan 🇹🇼, Tibet 🧧, Vietnam 🇻🇳, and the United States 🇺🇸!
新年快乐!身体健康! 万事予以!
It's the year of the ox.

I'm spilling the tea with @yang2010who gifted me with some warm bubble tea.

Do you celebrate the Lunar New Year? What do you do?

PDF Copy for Printing 

9.2.21

Digital Teacher Tools: Use Google Forms With a Lesson On Plato's Allegory of the Cave

Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Higher Education, Adult Education, Homeschooler, Not Grade Specific - TeachersPayTeachers.comTeaching Plato's Allegory of the Cave, use our assessment tool to evaluate students' understanding of Plato's theory of realityI was inspired to create this Google Forms resource when I noticed the popularity of my retelling of Plato's storyIn this story, Plato imagines a world where one man wakes up and questions what is real and what is not real. Have your students read this story with you and use my handy dandy comprehension questions and discussion activities to lead your students into an examination of Plato's metaphysical thinking.

Download on TpT, Made by Teachers, and Amazon


This resource is optimized for distance learning. The product includes THREE Google Forms links. Modify this resource for use on Google Classroom and other classroom management sites.


This resource includes the following features:

Essential Question: What is the gist of Plato's Allegory of the Cave?

  • The text of the story is Plato's Allegory of the Cave (Republic VII.514a-520a) 
    • The story is retold from the source material in easy-to-understand English. Great for a class read-and-share. Or, have students pair-read the text and then have a whole-class discussion.
  • THREE Google Forms Assessments
    • Multiple Choice Assessment
      • 5 Multiple Choice Questions
      • Student Self-Reflection Survey
    • Matching Assessment
      • 10 Matching Items
      • 2 Multiple Choice Questions
      • Student Self-Reflection Survey
    • Written Assessment
      • 5 Short Answer Questions
      • 2 Long Answer Questions
      • Student Self-Reflection Survey
  • Bibliography
    • Included is a shortlist of resources related to Plato's Allegory for both teachers and students.

Why Use Google Forms in a Classroom?

Google Forms allows teachers to collect information about students' learning. Google Forms are editable. You can fit these Google Forms assessment to your specific needs. You can modify, delete, or even edit questions. You can also change the points value for the assessment. Also, from a data-collection point of view, Google Forms give teachers a bird's-eye-view of student achievement — you can organize assessment results into amazing charts and graphs. You will then be able to identify what specifically students know and don't know.

Discover More of My Philosophy in the Classroom Series 

6.2.21

Teach Plato’s Allegory of the Cave with a Digital Educational Download from Stones of Erasmus

Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Higher Education, Adult Education, Homeschooler, Not Grade Specific - TeachersPayTeachers.com

If you want to teach philosophy to young people, start with some of Plato's myths, as recounted in his book The Republic. The most potent myth from Plato is the Allegory of the Cave. It's such a vivid metaphor for illustrating a specific type of search for truth  that your students will get it right away and not only enjoy reading the source material with you, but they'll surprise you with their takes on the narratives and connections to the real world.

Plato's Allegory of the Cave Digital Download
Download the digital resource on TpT, Amazon, or Made By Teachers!


If you want to teach philosophy to young people, use this lesson plan that introduces students to Plato’s theory of reality. I was inspired to create this resource when I retold the story of Plato’s Allegory of the Cave (from The Republic) in plain languageIn this story, Plato imagines a world where one man wakes up and questions what is real and not real. Have your students read this story with you, and use my handy dandy comprehension questions and discussion activities to lead your students to examine Plato’s metaphysical thinking. 

*This resource is optimized for distance learning. The product includes an editable Google Docs link. Modify this resource for use on Google Classroom and other classroom management sites*

This resource includes the following features:

Essential Question: How do I know what is really real?

  • The text of the story is included in this resource.

  • The story is retold from the source material in easy-to-understand English. Great for a class read-and-share. Or, have students pair-read the text and then have a whole-class discussion.

  • 15 reading comprehension questions

  • Useful for homework. To flip the classroom — assign the reading before you plan to discuss and have students complete the reading comprehension questions beforehand.

  • 6 Discussion Questions

  • Perfect for group work or a carousel activity — get your kids moving while discussing Plato!

  • 1 Chart to Explain Plato’s Two-World Theory 

  • Useful graphic organizer to understand Plato’s worldview

  • An answer key for both comprehension and discussion questions

  • Suggested Lesson Plan 

  • With more ideas and instructions on how to use this resource

  • Bibliography

  • I use the bibliography as a further reading resource for my students. Assign your curious scholars a research assignment or have students do projects based on books, links, and other material related to Plato they may find interesting or exciting.

Suggested Uses:

  1. Humanities Course on Ancient Greece

  2. World History Course on the History of Ideas 

  3. Literature Course

  4. Ethics Course — See how I used this resource in an Ethics class with 8th graders!

  5. Introduction to Philosophy Course

  6. Student Advisory Course on Drug and Alcohol Abuse 

  7. A Lesson on Truth

  8. A lesson on Appearance and Reality

    Discover More of My Philosophy in the Classroom Series 

    That Time My Mother Mailed Me a Mardi Gras King Cake from New Orleans

    King Cake from Gambino's Bakery in New Orleans
    Fedex delivered a king cake in a box
    from Gambino's Bakery in New Orleans.

    Unfrosted King Cake from Gambino's Bakery
    King Cake Before Its Frosted
    With Green, Purple, and Gold
    Today, Mom sent a king 👑 cake to me from @gambinosbakery in New Orleans. @ceiacrema helped me to open and decorate! Who’s ready for a king cake party? And who’s gonna get the baby? As a kid, we used to have Mardi Gras classroom parties. Think a colossal sheet cake from @winndixie covered in purple, green, and gold, and your entire first-grade class goes into a diabetic coma. Thankfully teachers knew to save the cake as a Friday thing (at the end of the day). Otherwise, nobody was learning anything. I know it’s a crazy year to celebrate 🎉 , but it’s Mardi Gras season y’all. Be safe, stay masked, and do your part to stop the spread of Covid-19. But that doesn’t mean you can’t have a slice, honey.

    30.1.21

    FREEBIE! 3-Box Note-Taking Template from Stones of Erasmus

    Use Google Apps in the Classroom? Do you need a note-taking template for students? Look no further.
    3-Box Note-taking Template

    Go Digital With a Note-Taking Template Compatible with Google Apps

    Going digital, I often bemoan that students do not always have clear ideas on how to take notes whilst on Zoom. Suffice it to say, no one is using a notebook anymore. So I came up with something old and borrowed and traditional and put it into a zesty digital format.

    Here is a freebie for y'all to share with your students. It's a simple-to-use digital note-taking template.

    Questions:

    In this section, students can do one of two things (or both). First, they can record questions they have so they won't forget. Second, they can generate test-type questions. Studies show when students start thinking like the teacher, they are more likely to do well on tests and other assessments.

    Notes:

    In this section, students jot down what they hear in class in the normal way. I don't expect students to take down everything I say. The gist is what I'm after.

    Summary:

    At the end of class, or for independent work, students take time to digest what was learned in class and write down everything in a summative paragraph form. Great for retention! Also, if you prefer the old school method, I got you. Once you download the template, you'll see there are both versions available, print and digital.

    You can download the FREEBIE on my TpT store OR you can click the link below!

    PDF Copy of FREEBIE!