Showing posts with label video. Show all posts
Showing posts with label video. Show all posts

5.1.24

Things in My Type ‘B’ Classroom that just Makes Sense

Welcome to 'Things in My Type ‘B’ Classroom that Just Makes Sense,' a unique exploration of the unconventional yet harmonious world of a Type B classroom. In this post, we delve into the charmingly unorganized library, the intriguing 'Random Bowls,' and the essential first aid kit, each element artfully contributing to the distinctiveness of our learning environment. 
Discover how these seemingly haphazard items are not merely decorative but integral to our educational fabric, fostering an atmosphere of discovery and engagement. Join us as we celebrate the eclectic and purposeful arrangement that defines the spirit of a Type B classroom, where every item has a story and every corner a lesson.

In my Type Two classroom, a charmingly unorganized library coexists with a ‘Random Bowl’ and a first aid kit, nestled beside another ‘Random Bowl.’ Each element, though appearing haphazard, subtly underscores the distinctiveness of a Type B classroom. Here, an assorted collection of items isn’t just decorative; they’re integral, seamlessly weaving into the fabric of our learning space. This arrangement fosters an atmosphere where eclectic, unconventional elements find harmony and purpose, enhancing the sense of discovery and engagement in our educational journey.

20.12.23

🛡️ A Journey Through History at The Met’s Arms and Armor Gallery 🏰

Explore medieval combat and chivalry at The Met's Arms and Armor Gallery. Discover the impact of 'dexterous' warriors and the art of jousting.
 

I’m up early this morning, y’all. Today’s adventure brought me to the awe-inspiring arms and armor room at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Here, amidst the relics of the Middle Ages, I found myself pondering the art of warfare and chivalry.










From the magnificent European suits of armor to the exquisite samurai gear of Japan’s Edo period, the collection is a vivid tapestry of history and culture. 🗡️🎎

27.7.23

Aesthetic Thursday: Encountering St. Firmin, the Ultimate Multitasker from the 4th Century, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Embark on a historical journey with a visit to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, home to a striking 13th-century French limestone sculpture of St. Firmin, the fourth-century multitasker. Explore the mesmerizing world of medieval art and uncover the enigmatic saint's intriguing tale of unwavering faith, becoming a bishop, and his peculiar post-decapitation joy. 
I am at the Metropolitan Museum of Art today, and I embark on a captivating journey through time as we explore the mesmerizing world of medieval art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Our focus lies on an intriguing 13th-century French limestone sculpture of none other than St. Firmin, a high-achieving multitasker hailing from the fourth-century (i.e., a Roman Catholic Saint with a penchant for carrying his decapitated head).

Encountering St. Firmin, the ultimate multitasker from the 4th century, at the #MetropolitanMuseumOfArt today. 🎨🏛️ Staring at this 13th-century French wooden sculpture, it's clear this #Saint wasn't your average holy man! 😇🙏 Quickly ascending the celestial corporate ladder, he claimed the coveted position of Bishop at #Amiens.

But here's the quirky part — he's joyfully holding his head! Yes, you read that right. A case of post-decapitation bliss, perhaps? 😂🤔 Nevertheless, he seems quite content. Go, hun!

A day well spent appreciating #ArtHistory and uncovering some divine oddities. Truly, there's nothing like a #SaintStory to keep things interesting! 💫📖

As we stand before this masterful creation, we can't help but wonder about the life and accomplishments of this enigmatic saint. St. Firmn's journey was one of immense determination and unwavering faith. Climbing the celestial corporate ladder, he eventually earned the esteemed position of bishop at Amiens, France – a feat that undoubtedly demanded great dedication and virtue.

Yet, what truly captivates us is the portrayal of St. Firmin holding his head in his hands, an expression of joy illuminating his features. His happiness and contentment in this sculpture are palpable, leaving us with the question: What was the source of his boundless joy?
A limestone sculpture of Saint Firmin
Saint Firmin


Indeed Saint Firmin is a real person and is said to have been beheaded in Amiens, France; his feast day is celebrated on September 25th. However, historical records do not confirm the exact year of his death. It's believed to have occurred during the early 4th century, possibly around 303 C.E. Miracles attributed to the discovery and translation of his relics during the time of Bishop Savin are part of the saint's hagiography.

Steeped in history, medieval art provides a rich tapestry of stories that often speak to the human experience. St. Firmn's sculpture is no exception. The depiction of a saint holding his head symbolizes his unwavering devotion to the church, even amidst the trials and challenges he faced. Also, Saint Firmin is a martyr, which means he gave up his life for his belief and devotion to Christ. In this way, martyrs are often depicted in the same way they were killed — in this example, by cutting off the poor saint's head. To illustrate that for the Christian — death is not the end, but a beginning — he carries his head as a defiance against the ravages of sin and death. And how are you doing?

Seeing such a treasure trove of medieval pieces at the Metropolitan Museum of Art is also cool. The museum serves as a befitting venue for our encounter with St. Firmn. Its halls house an extensive collection of art that transcends time, mimicking the architecture of a Gothic cathedral, allowing us to connect with our past and embrace the beauty of diverse cultures and histories.

So, next time you find yourself at the Met, take a moment to visit this 13th-century French limestone sculpture and meet the remarkable St. Firmn. Witness his joy and dedication, and let it be a reminder that happiness lies in pursuing our passions and fulfilling our purpose in life. Keep your head on properly.

In conclusion, a visit to the Metropolitan Museum of Art can be more than just an exploration of history – it can also be an introspective journey, connecting us with the triumphs and struggles of those who came before us. Let St. Firmn's story inspire us as we continue our paths, aiming to find joy and fulfillment in our endeavors, just as he did in the fourth century.

20.7.23

Kronos (Chronus) Dethroned: Otherwise Known as Saturn Retold in an Engaging 3-Day Lesson from Stones of Erasmus

@cafedumonde "I use my Granny voice and tell the story of Cronus and how he was dethroned by Zeus, thus beginning the Titanomachy." #GreekMythology #Cronus #Zeus #Titanomachy #Storytelling #ancientlegends ♬ Moonlight Sonata - Beethoven - Classical Piano - Instrumental Classical Music - Classical Playlist - Sleeping Music - Music For Relaxation - Classical Piano & Classical Music & Classical

In the intricate tapestry of Greek mythology, few figures stand as tall as Kronos, or Saturn, the eminent ruler of the Titans. The child of Gaia, the earth, and Uranus, the sky, Kronos epitomizes a generation of divine entities that have forever etched their stories in our cultural psyche. Commonly recognized as the God of Time, a title possibly introduced later by Greek writers like Hesiod, Kronos' tale commences at the heart of the cosmos, quite literally birthed from the earth and sky.
Detail_view_Greek_vase_showing_Rhea_tricking_Kronos_with_stone_instead_of_Zeus
Rhea tricks Kronos

A pivotal figure, Kronos ascended to power in a manner that was anything but ordinary. In a bold move of patricide, he seized power from Uranus, his father, through a gruesome act of castration. Ouch. This gruesome act had far-reaching consequences. In a twist of mythological irony, the remains of Uranus's severed genitals mingled with the sea and gave birth to Aphrodite, the Goddess of Love. And that's what love's got to do with it — a tale that powerfully demonstrates the interconnectedness of love and strife.

Kronos' union with Rhea, one of the Titanides, was steeped in tumult and apprehension. Haunted by the specter of his brutal ascension, Kronos was convinced that his children would repeat his actions. Driven by fear and paranoia, he devoured each newborn — Hestia, Demeter, Hera, Hades, and Poseidon. However, Rhea, weary of her husband's horrifying dietary habits, hatched a plan to save their last child, Zeus.

In an act of maternal bravery, Rhea tricked Kronos by giving him a stone cloaked in infant's clothes instead of her newborn. Meanwhile, Zeus was spirited away to the island of Crete, where nymphs tenderly cared for him until he came of age. As an adult, Zeus infiltrated Kronos' court, cunningly earning the Titan King's trust as his cupbearer. When the time was ripe, Zeus served Kronos a potent concoction that caused the Titan to regurgitate his swallowed children. This act marked the beginning of Zeus' retribution, leading to a decade-long war and, ultimately, the retrieval of his rightful Olympian throne.

Indeed, Kronos' narrative is a compelling tapestry of cosmic power plays, familial betrayal, cunning stratagems, and ultimate redemption. Through its rich, engaging tales, Greek mythology continues to captivate, offering timeless lessons on life, power, and destiny.
Stones of Erasmus creates quality educational digital downloads such as this 3-Day lesson pack on the Greek Titan God Kronos or Saturn
Kronos: 3-Day Lesson

Looking to impart a riveting 3-day lesson to your middle or high school students in English Language Arts or Humanities? We've got you covered. Head over to the Stones of Erasmus TpT store and grab a copy today. Enhance your teaching experience effortlessly.

18.7.23

Admiring Saint Catherine of Alexandria: A 16th Century Italian Sculpture at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Join me on a journey through time, appreciating a 16th-century Italian sculpture of the Christian martyr, Catherine of Alexandria, on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.


In the heart of New York City lies a treasure trove of artistic marvels — the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Today, my admiration was captured by an exquisite 16th-century Italian sculpture depicting Catherine of Alexandria, a revered Christian martyr from the third century.
Saint Catherine of Alexandria,
Cristoforo Solari, Italian, ca. 1514-24

The saint stands regal, and she has on her side the instrument of her martyrdom — a wheel in which she was tied to and tortured. But — wait, look at her feet — it is the head of the emperor. So — even in death, Christianity wins — for she has defeated paganism. What?!

The detailed portrayal of Saint Catherine evokes her timeless courage and spiritual strength. Originally from Egypt, Catherine's legacy extends beyond geographical and temporal boundaries, continuing to inspire individuals across centuries.

Each stroke, each detailed carving in this Italian masterpiece, resonates with the passion of an artist, reverently capturing the essence of the saint. It is a tangible connection to a time gone by, a bridge between the present and the past.

As I stood there, taking in the silent beauty of this sculpture, I couldn't help but wonder about the varied art forms that touch our hearts. What is your favorite work of art? In its many manifestations, art connects us, narrates past stories, and provokes introspection. Let's continue this journey of art appreciation together, exploring and rediscovering the relics of history.

16.7.23

A Marvel in Marble: The Angel Relief Sculpture by Antonio Rizzo at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Explore a captivating 15th-century marble relief by Antonio Rizzo at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, bridging modern life with Renaissance grandeur.

Today, I found myself immersed in the magnificence of 15th-century Italian art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. A marble relief of a youthful angel holding a shield, crafted by the masterful hands of Antonio Rizzo in 1470, caught my attention.
Angel Holding a Shield, Antonio Rizzo, Italian, 1470

      Antonio Rizzo, a Venetian, renowned for his exquisite artistry during the Italian Renaissance, has intricately carved this ethereal figure in such a way that every detail unfolds a story. One could imagine it initially adorned an ornate doorway or entranceway, in Venice, greeting onlookers with its divine elegance.
     The angel's face, in particular, is the highlight of the sculpture. The superior skill evident in the relief's intricate facial detailing is mesmerizing. The artistry so profoundly etched in marble seems to transcend the realm of humans, creating a space that teeters between our world and the celestial one.
     Accompanied by my granny, a mutual connoisseur of 15th-century relief sculptures, we spent a meaningful moment admiring this masterpiece. The experience brought alive the extravagance of the period, a feeling often captured by the “granny” voice that I use for social media narration.
     In a world so connected yet often detached, the angel by Antonio Rizzo at the Metropolitan Museum of Art bridges the gap between our modern lives and the artistic grandeur of the Renaissance. As it did in the 15th century, it inspires and evokes wonder, reminding us that art can sometimes evoke wonder and reverence.

12.7.23

Marveling at Tullio Lombardo's Young Warrior: A Journey into Late 15th Century Venetian Art


Tucked into a portion of the east side of Central Park in New York City, nestled among a myriad of remarkable artifacts at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, stands a profound example of late 15th-century Venetian art. This remarkable piece is a marble sculpture of a young warrior by Tullio Lombardo, a master of the Italian Renaissance from Venice. The immersive experience of admiring this piece face-to-face truly transcends the ordinary museum visit.

10.7.23

Exploring Ancient Rome: The Majestic Bust of Marcus Aurelius at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

I've taken to re-visiting some of my favorite works of art. Here's a fantastic piece from Rome — created around the second century C.E.
Exploring the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City today. I’m admiring a second-century C.E. bust of a Roman youth. This isn’t just any youth - it’s a youthful portrait of Marcus Aurelius, the philosopher and Roman emperor.

7.7.23

Exploring Artistic Marvels: Unveiling the Spinario at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

I’m at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and admiring a 16th-century copy of a bronze sculpture from an ancient work now held at the Capitoline Museum in Rome. It’s called the Spinario and it depicts a youth pulling a thorn out of his foot.
Exploring art's timelessness at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, captivated by the Spinario—a 16th-century replica of a poignant ancient masterpiece, depicting a youth's tender act of self-care.

6.1.22

Aesthetic Thursday: People Who Found Their "Twin" in Old Paintings

In this video repost on my blog, I report the uncanny phenomenon of regular folks finding their doppelgängers in old paintings. Maybe I will find mine soon enough!
Have you ever seen an old painting and seen someone who looks eerily similar to yourself? This isn't just a coincidence - some people have found their "twin" in artwork from centuries ago! These unique instances of serendipity are becoming more common thanks to the rise of facial recognition technology.
     For instance, British researcher Nick Barraclough was researching a portrait painted by Dutch artist Frans Hals in 1633 when he noticed that one of the figures bore a striking resemblance to himself. After further investigation, he discovered that he is descended from the same family as the sitter in this 350-year-old painting! Similarly, Ross W. Duffin recently stumbled across his doppelgänger: a warrior from a 17th-century Jan van Bijlert painting. “I thought, ‘Wow, that is really funny, he looks just like me,’” Dr. Duffin recalled. Then he moved on.
     These stories remind us how much our world has changed since these paintings were created — yet how little we truly know about our pasts. It's incredible to think that something as simple as recognizing your own face can lead you on such an incredible journey back into history. Who knows what secrets you may uncover if you continue searching for yourself and those long-forgotten ancestors?

16.9.21

Why I Love TikTok Content Creators (And So Should You) — And a List of Zany TikToks I Found

I have a penchant for the theatrical. 
The dime novel. The beauty in the absurd. The homemade movie. The guy with the camera turned on himself. The take-a-household-item-and-make-a-prop kind of performativity. 

You get the gist.

And where can you find the most beautiful schlock the Internet has ever created? Why go no further than TikTok. It's a platform where content creators put their own identities front and center — and it's a highly satisfying romp.

If you didn't know — TikTok is a mobile video app owned by the Chinese company ByteDance. The first iteration of the app was dubbed Musical.ly, authored by software Engineers Alex Zhu and Luyu Yang. Basically, the app began as a lip syncing app called Musical.ly and its companion live streaming app called live.ly. TikTok was a rebrand of the app that attempted to fold both features of the two social apps into one.

And the rest is history. 

Just as Twitter revolutionized the short writing form of 265 characters, TikTok has ushered in the micro-length video form of 15 to 30 seconds.

The draw of TikTok is twofold — it’s easy to use and to create content with, coupled with its immense sound and music library and its unending filter library. However, the best TikToks have neither — they’re pure spun dioramas of peoples constructed private lives. And it’s why I first was enamored of the platform — peering into people’s live created in a dizzying array of quick action theater of the absurd. 

Here are some gems I’ve collected along the way. 

1. The Smiling, Waving Homage to The Sitcom Montage
This teen has an instinctual appreciation for the visual grammar of the iconic television sitcom montage — ignore the silly tune — and pay attention to how his edits match perfectly something out of American television classics Growing Pains or Family Ties.

2. Antoinette's Casual Use of the Cigarette
It’s easy to dismiss @antoniteegrams because her videos are riffs on soundbytes. But she’s so humble in her mien and I love her casual use of the cigarette. I have no idea what the original source of the soundbyte is but that’s what makes TikTok endearing. Any random noise can be strewn into actor’s gold. Andy Warhol was partly right — in the future everyone will be famous — but not just for five minutes, but for as long as you have working Internet and a smartphone with a halfway decent camera.

3. The Family Dinner Table is Often a Suitable Mise-en-Scene
@eddiepdoyle videos his grandmother’s acerbic comebacks in dozens of video. TikTok has made many folks Internet famous because a cousin, or grandson, or daughter, or someone, picked up a camera and started candidly filming a family member. The immediacy of the moment is right at your fingertips, as if you’ve stumbled into this woman’s cluttered kitchen and she wants to know what you want from her. Classic.

4. A Colorful Edit

It’s possible that this edit is rather basic. But it's relatively early TikTok. I like the use of color and fashion and the sheer fact that the guy is having a lot of fun. And that's quite a mess for one less-than-thirty-second video.

5. Boys Wear Tee-Shirts on Their Heads When They Play a Girl
So teenage boys on TikTok will don a tee-shirt on their head when they're playing a female role. It's sheer schlock. But a testament to the fact that no TikTok star has a wardrobe warehouse or access to MGM studios. Although, it is odd that teenage boys think a woman's hair is well represented by donning a tee on their head. Oh, girl!

6. Sissy That Walk!
If you can't get on the runway, girl you better werk. So does this amazing runway walk that is probably this TikToker's backyard. Sissy that walk!

7. The Five Minute Bathroom Break 
TikTok lends a view into working class jobs — fast food attendants, nail salonists, customer service representatives, and the lot. One thing network television cannot do — even though it has tried with shows like All in the Family and Roseanne — is replicate the experience of an everyday American's day at work. And often that means taking a five minute bathroom break and talking to the mirror. Period.

8. Right?!
I am not sure what to think of this video. Brilliant? Yes.

9. The Smiling Boy
This boy has created an entire fandom over the fact that he is a teenager who enjoys smiling.

10. The Histrionic School Lunch Lady Performance
Again put a piece of fabric on your head and all of a sudden you are a woman. And I wouldn't even call this drag. I call it histrionic performativity. And I didn't steal that from Judith Butler.

11. It's Got To Be the Sweater
It could be ironic that this guy is wearing a Playboy sweater. Right?! Multiple Tik-Toks are created by people, mostly teenagers, who are bored. And lots of TikTokers were born out of the Covid-19 pandemic.

12. The Best Comedian is Probably Your Neighbor, Mr. Pickles
Again — the beauty of TikTok is that it creates stars out of ordinary people. I love this guy's vulnerability and authenticity all packaged into a nice, yellowy-orangey color scheme.

28.4.20

Navigating the Emotional Upsurge in COVID-19 Times: Reflections & Coping Strategies

How are you doing? I have a theory about COVID-19. It heightens everything. If you're an anxious person. You're more anxious. If you're worried. You're more worried. It's the season of the conqueror worm. But you got this. Drop a like if you agree.

My days are filled with an array of activities: meticulously planning lessons, diligently grading papers, leisurely lounging at home, savoring meals, engaging in spirited games of pinochle, delving into the latest Mad magazine, and embracing moments of introspection to reconnect with my inner child. What about you? What have you been up to lately?

18.3.20

Video Repost: Cute Kid Gives Sage Criticism on Consumer Culture

In this video repost, listen to a cute kid give sage advice on how to avoid consumerism.
Girbaud Brand Jeans — Remember Them?
When I was a teenager, in the 1990s, the French jeans clothier Marithé et François Girbaud was in style. I remember I bought these jeans because I thought I needed them. They were cool! Everyone was wearing them. Now. They were cool. But, in retrospect — looking back on it — jeans are jeans. Girbaud jeans had a privileged quality attached to them. Wearing the Girbaud brand was like being christened with a superpower. Jeans with the Girbaud logo were easily noticeable, so everyone in your school could identify who had the right pair of jeans. If your jeans were Wal-mart storebought, you were doomed.

The Kid in the Video is Non-Plussed about Consumerism
What I like about the kid in this video is that not only is he non-plussed by consumerism, he also can make his own aesthetic judgments. He says he knows what he likes and Filas fit him well and he likes the color.

What shoes do the other kids in the park expect kids to wear to avoid being ostracized? I'd like to know.

What's Your Take on This Video?
Let me know if you have ever been made less because you did not conform to consumer culture.
stonesoferasmus.com

11.1.20

Flash Fiction: Rocky Embankment Stream of Consciousness

     
     There's a rocky embankment that you're probably not supposed to walk on because it's filled with old age and danger. And of course, I fall flat on my face, and as I'm falling and thinking, “Oh, fudge!” When in danger, time goes in slow motion. I feel my knee pressed against the ground. It’s purple, bruised and I scratch my forearm. It’s nighttime, and I don't know how I’ll be able to climb out of this embankment. I have shorts that I wear in Summer. No pockets - so I had my wallet stuck into my shorts like a silly boy, and I had keys tucked into my shorts, and I had my phone, and everything stuck into my shorts - you know - in the lapel part of your shorts where your M matches the seam, and everything just falls into place. I don't know how I’ll be able to save my sandwich from falling into the rocks, and I had my keys, and I am like “this hurts,” and I’m stuck to the rock, and I don't know how I’ll get out. If I were injured more ... I ‘m lucky, but I'm like, “where's my phone?” I couldn't find my phone, so my phone at this moment is still lodged in the rocks of Lake Champlain. I wait till tomorrow morning to get it, but it's a big long story - the short version is I basically follow my tracks back to the rocky shores of Lake Champlain - and that's been my day so far. Now I'm back in my hotel room telling you the story on my iPad, and hopefully tomorrow morning I will wake up and locate my phone from the rocks so also what's wrong with me because there it is - I found it - inches away from where I fell. I could've walked a few meters more, and there was a path that takes you down into a depthless semigloss lake - that's safe, but “Yeah” - I don't know what’s wrong with me. 
~ transcribed at the scene.

6.1.20

Watch This Video of a Stray Dog Fed by a Subway Sandwich Employee and Tell Me How It Makes You Feel


Cute Feel-Good-About-Humans-Doing-Good Videos  
I like cute videos. Like this one. I’m happy. When I watch it. I think it’s the expectant face of the dog. They looks so forlorn yet satisfied. A Homo sapiens will feed it. They are sure. And as a watcher on the scene, my tummy is filled by witnessing the showcase of sliced deli meat and tidbits - I’m reminded of a parable. Even the dogs feed from the scraps of the master’s table. And then I’m reminded of a Rembrandt painting hanging in the Hermitage inspired by that same parable - a father’s hand on his beloved son once prodigal.
Maybe it’s because I’ve come to peace with my own need for a father. It’s primal. To want the love of a parent. And at the same time, it’s powerful to exert oneself in the world as a child without the need of one. Father. Mother. Caregiver. Licking one’s wounds grows wearisome. Feeling sorry for oneself is a bit pathetic. That’s why I like the canine in this scene. Not pathetic or stupid. Just expectant. For a bit of meat. Chosen from the master’s table.

8.5.19

On the Imagination: Doors Are Indicators of Openings Into Other Worlds

The original Poltergeist movie (1982) perfectly utilizes the
ancient idea of a portal to another world.
I took a class in Graduate school on the Arthurian Legend. I wrote a paper on the duality of evil and good children in the myth - relating it to the Hollywood movies The Sixth Sense and The Good Son. Anyway. One thing I took away from that class was how the idea of doors as portals into other worlds is an old archetype located in the oldest myths and stories that have sprung from humankind's first stories. In the Hindu story of Krishna opening his mouth as a child to show his mother the universe, to the Celtic stories of fairy mounds and magical portals, to the Lady of the Lake breaking the surface of the water to reveal the legendary sword Excalibur. If you live in New York City, stepping into the underground concourse of subterranean subway tunnels is a daily excursion into the upside, downside aspect of city-living. The Netflix Television series Stranger Things is a recent foray into this genre. The show has created an entire mythology around this old concept in its imaginative world-building of the Upside Down. I like how Phillip Pullman in his fantasy series The Golden Compass has his hero wield a blade that cuts into the fabric of space and time, thus able to cross between worlds. Or, that famous image from the movie Poltergeist in which Carol Anne extends her hand toward the white, emanating glow of the television set. Portals can be sunken into the imagination of tales and storytelling told by the fire, but there is a truth in the telling. Fantasy fiction, as well as science fiction, uses portals and doorways. For example - Dr. Who's T.A.R.D.I.S. is the stuff of science fiction lore, but the idea of a quantum-powered engine that can skip across space and time seems plausible. And with images from astronomers showing us what Black Holes sort of look like, the idea of traversing across the universe through cosmic doorways seems real to me somehow. We (i.e., humans) just don't have the technology. Yet. I wonder if in the forthcoming centuries we humans will make the old legends true. We first have to figure out the problem of massive incoming changes in the earth's climate that is fastly becoming our next existential threat - but after that! - we have goals to tend to - ad astra!

I found this whimsical video on the video streaming app Tik Tok. I am not sure if this place actually exists - but if it does I want to go there! Video Source: @elliedothoe

Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Higher Education, Adult Education, Homeschooler, Not Grade Specific - TeachersPayTeachers.com
I sell lesson plans for the
English and Humanities crowd (and more!)

21.4.19

Time-Lapse Video: Kids Play at Brant Point Lighthouse

Brant Point Lighthouse
Here's another video of our school group visiting the island of Nantucket for Spring Break. We explored the beach surrounding the Brant Point Lighthouse. We woke up early and hiked to the lighthouse. The weather was fresh and chilly. It's Springtime in Nantucket, Massachusetts. Life is good. Seize the moment. Seize the day. Carpe diem.
Viewing Tip: do you notice the ferry leaving the island? That's the same ferry in the video I posted (see the previous post).


19.4.19

Time-Lapse Video: The Eagle Departs Nantucket Island En Route for Hyannis



Spring Break with Kids from School
I was with a school group on Spring Break in Nantucket. Here's a short time-lapse video of the ferry leaving the island en route for Hyannis. We were on the Eagle, a sea-faring vessel built in Morgan City, Louisiana. The trip was fun. I liked hanging out with the kids. The weather was chilly and invigorating. I ate lobster. We went on a ghost tour. We ate s'mores. Life can be amazing.
Go Back in Time Two Years Ago
Two years ago, I did a similar trip with our school. Here is the time-lapse video of the ferry once we arrived at Hyannis.

12.1.19

Video Repost: Braden Gives His Bubblegum Book Report in Season One of the Mickey Mouse Club Reboot (circa 1990s)

I was never a fan of the Mickey Mouse Club reboot on the Disney Channel - mainly, because I am not sure if we had the Disney Channel in my house or not (I honestly cannot remember). However, I came upon this trite little gem - it's a cute little skit - and it reminds me of the innocence I recall from circa 1990s television craziness. I cannot put my finger on it - but television in the 1990s was just plain cotton candy madness. It was sweet - and totally unreeled from any kind of substantial aesthetic. I love how the above skit takes place on a stage with a live audience - kind of like how Nickelodeon did its shows back in the day - and a kind of tween version of Saturday Night Live. Now. I love how the girl gives her sterling report on Moby Dick. Great job. But why does she give an apple for the teacher - isn't that a bribe? And then comes Braden's report - one of the stars of the early reboot days of The Mickey Mouse Club. His report rings true for me - because I can remember a classmate pulled a similar stunt in a class once. He tried to give a class report on one of the elements of the periodic table and he passed out a brochure he had made with the name of the element printed on it - he was so proud of his ersatz report that I remember it still to this day. I guess it is the same for our man Braden. I would remember his report - and he gives it with such Americana teen bravado that I was surprised that the teacher was scowling. And in a kind of teen rebellion-cum-audience mob effect - the live action crowd is totally into it. Go Braden! A+

2.8.18

Short Time Lapse Video of the Garbage Train that Runs from Bushwick to Virginia

A CSX garbage train rolls underneath 41st Avenue in the Elmhurst neighborhood of Queens. Waste collected by New York City's Department of Sanitation is picked up by the train in Bushwick, then it wends its way through Middle Village, then into Elmhurst, and in Astoria, it crosses the Hell’s Gate bridge where CSX takes that trash to Virginia - the home of cheaper cigarettes.