7.3.21

Subject: Hello, March! March is for Mars! And It's Springtime in TeacherLandia (And I Have a Freebie for You)

In this post, I talk about how I have been crazy obsessed with making mythology-related content for the middle and high school classroom.
Greig Roselli does a live video chat on WhatsApp
It's March, and I've been teaching 
either from home or in a classroom. Hey, Y'all!

March is For Mars, Right?

It's March. And what that means for me is that I get to ask my students, "What god from mythology is the month of March named for?" And, you know what? Don't feel bad if you can't immediately come up with the correct answer. It's one of those questions that is obvious once you know the answer. *Spoiler Alert*Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Higher Education, Adult Education, Homeschooler, Staff, Not Grade Specific - TeachersPayTeachers.com for stonesoferasmus The Greek god Mars (Or Ares in Latin). And I have a lesson for you. I have a freebie that helps students build vocabulary through Greek and Roman mythology. Myth is to Language what Recipes are to Food! You cannot have one without the other.

FREEBIE!: All About Mythology for the Middle and High School Set

I guess I am obsessed with myth. It's probably because mythology is just really cool, and I am determined to not make learning about myths just a Percy Jackson thing. Myths are actually exquisite artifacts to teach in High School (even though they get relegated to elementary and early middle school curricula). I just made a ton of myth-related resources in my Teachers Pay Teachers store. And to celebrate March and Spring (and the god Mars), I made my dazzling lesson on Prometheus totally free. So you can see a sneak peek of what I am doing in the realm of educational digital resources for middle and high school students. Some of the best things I have made related to mythology are designed for the late middle and high school classrooms. And I think that's really cool. And oh, if you are more of an Amazon person, I have a store there too!

Prometheus Bound for the Classroom

Prometheus Middle and High School Classroom Lesson Plan

It's based on the story of Prometheus, the Titan who befriended Zeus. His name means “forethought,” which is kinda funny only when you realize his brother Epimetheus's name means “afterthought.” This gets even funnier when you realize that according to the myth, Prometheus had the forethought to warn his brother, "OK! Zeus is going to gift you with a beautiful woman named Pandora! Don't accept!" But since he was an afterthought  when the time came  Zeus said, "OK. Here is a gift for you, Epimetheus." And the rest is history!

And Why New Orleans is a Decent Inspiration for Mythology

I am originally from New Orleans. It’s where I got my first jolt of mythology because during Mardi Gras season — all the Krewes are made up of references to Greek mythology. You have the Krewe of Orpheus and the Mystic Krewe of Momus and Comus and Rex (Latin, not Greek, I know). And having read lots of William Faulkner, you know life in the south can mirror a Greek tragedy (or comedy!).

       How do I keep it woke? How do I make ancient Greek or Latin myths relevant to living in the Americas in 2021? Easy — lots and lots of text-to-text and text-to-world connections. Did you know that March is named after a god? It's because of Greek and Norse mythology that the days of the weeks are what they are? The more you know, right?

So keep a lookout for a new product I am creating based on New Orleans, Mardi Gras, and Mythology!

Thanks for reading my blog. It's been a labor of love for over ten years. Can you believe it! XOXOXOXO

Greig Roselli (from Stones of Erasmus)





6.3.21

Another Day of Concurrent Teaching: Covid-19 Pandemic Teacher Journal #2

Get Lit
Mr. Roselli wears a "get lit" tee.

I teach teenagers concurrently in person and kids learning remotely. To build community, my co-teacher @amiraesposito5585 and I call the in-person kids Roomies and the distance learning kids, Zoomies. 

Roomies got a hard lifeBut not all the Roomies are complaining.


American teens aren’t reading less — they’re just reading fewer classics. They’re reading on their phones, on the Internet — listening to stories via audiobooks and podcasts. Literacy is changing, and I’m excited about it.

The tee-shirt reads, “Get lit.” Get it? I struggle with authenticity. How real is too real? Where do I go to find folks who look 👀 like me, act like me, think 🤔 like me? Literature. In my classroom. Young people. People who think differently. Radical openness. It’s something I teach. But it’s also the ultimate pleasure. Literature — it’s the best tea. And whether it’s Satan being emo in Paradise Lost or Rashad in American Boys (@jasonreynolds83) reflecting on his blackness in America or Felix in Felix Ever After (@kacen.callender) navigating high school as a trans boy in New York — characters in literature come alive for me.

27.2.21

Paint Night: We Did Van Gogh's Sunflowers

I’m no Van Gogh. I have both 👂. But I love a good communal 🎨. With my collegial krewe, we paint and pass the time.

12.2.21

It’s Lunar New Year 2021 — Drink a Bubble Tea and Rejoice

Lunar New Year in 2021 at Garden School in Jackson Heights, New York City
Me, vibing, with bubble tea — a New Year's gift from a fellow teacher.

It's a new year in the Lunar East Asian Calendar. Shout out to friends in mainland China 🇨🇳, Taiwan 🇹🇼, Tibet 🧧, Vietnam 🇻🇳, and the United States 🇺🇸!
新年快乐!身体健康! 万事予以!
It's the year of the ox.

I'm spilling the tea with @yang2010who gifted me with some warm bubble tea.

Do you celebrate the Lunar New Year? What do you do?

PDF Copy for Printing 

9.2.21

Digital Teacher Tools: Use Google Forms With a Lesson On Plato's Allegory of the Cave

Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Higher Education, Adult Education, Homeschooler, Not Grade Specific - TeachersPayTeachers.comTeaching Plato's Allegory of the Cave, use our assessment tool to evaluate students' understanding of Plato's theory of realityI was inspired to create this Google Forms resource when I noticed the popularity of my retelling of Plato's storyIn this story, Plato imagines a world where one man wakes up and questions what is real and what is not real. Have your students read this story with you and use my handy dandy comprehension questions and discussion activities to lead your students into an examination of Plato's metaphysical thinking.

Download on TpT, Made by Teachers, and Amazon


This resource is optimized for distance learning. The product includes THREE Google Forms links. Modify this resource for use on Google Classroom and other classroom management sites.


This resource includes the following features:

Essential Question: What is the gist of Plato's Allegory of the Cave?

  • The text of the story is Plato's Allegory of the Cave (Republic VII.514a-520a) 
    • The story is retold from the source material in easy-to-understand English. Great for a class read-and-share. Or, have students pair-read the text and then have a whole-class discussion.
  • THREE Google Forms Assessments
    • Multiple Choice Assessment
      • 5 Multiple Choice Questions
      • Student Self-Reflection Survey
    • Matching Assessment
      • 10 Matching Items
      • 2 Multiple Choice Questions
      • Student Self-Reflection Survey
    • Written Assessment
      • 5 Short Answer Questions
      • 2 Long Answer Questions
      • Student Self-Reflection Survey
  • Bibliography
    • Included is a shortlist of resources related to Plato's Allegory for both teachers and students.

Why Use Google Forms in a Classroom?

Google Forms allows teachers to collect information about students' learning. Google Forms are editable. You can fit these Google Forms assessment to your specific needs. You can modify, delete, or even edit questions. You can also change the points value for the assessment. Also, from a data-collection point of view, Google Forms give teachers a bird's-eye-view of student achievement — you can organize assessment results into amazing charts and graphs. You will then be able to identify what specifically students know and don't know.

Discover More of My Philosophy in the Classroom Series 

6.2.21

Teach Plato’s Allegory of the Cave with a Digital Educational Download from Stones of Erasmus

Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Higher Education, Adult Education, Homeschooler, Not Grade Specific - TeachersPayTeachers.com

If you want to teach philosophy to young people, start with some of Plato's myths, as recounted in his book The Republic. The most potent myth from Plato is the Allegory of the Cave. It's such a vivid metaphor for illustrating a specific type of search for truth  that your students will get it right away and not only enjoy reading the source material with you, but they'll surprise you with their takes on the narratives and connections to the real world.

Plato's Allegory of the Cave Digital Download
Download the digital resource on TpT, Amazon, or Made By Teachers!


If you want to teach philosophy to young people, use this lesson plan that introduces students to Plato’s theory of reality. I was inspired to create this resource when I retold the story of Plato’s Allegory of the Cave (from The Republic) in plain languageIn this story, Plato imagines a world where one man wakes up and questions what is real and not real. Have your students read this story with you, and use my handy dandy comprehension questions and discussion activities to lead your students to examine Plato’s metaphysical thinking. 

*This resource is optimized for distance learning. The product includes an editable Google Docs link. Modify this resource for use on Google Classroom and other classroom management sites*

This resource includes the following features:

Essential Question: How do I know what is really real?

  • The text of the story is included in this resource.

  • The story is retold from the source material in easy-to-understand English. Great for a class read-and-share. Or, have students pair-read the text and then have a whole-class discussion.

  • 15 reading comprehension questions

  • Useful for homework. To flip the classroom — assign the reading before you plan to discuss and have students complete the reading comprehension questions beforehand.

  • 6 Discussion Questions

  • Perfect for group work or a carousel activity — get your kids moving while discussing Plato!

  • 1 Chart to Explain Plato’s Two-World Theory 

  • Useful graphic organizer to understand Plato’s worldview

  • An answer key for both comprehension and discussion questions

  • Suggested Lesson Plan 

  • With more ideas and instructions on how to use this resource

  • Bibliography

  • I use the bibliography as a further reading resource for my students. Assign your curious scholars a research assignment or have students do projects based on books, links, and other material related to Plato they may find interesting or exciting.

Suggested Uses:

  1. Humanities Course on Ancient Greece

  2. World History Course on the History of Ideas 

  3. Literature Course

  4. Ethics Course — See how I used this resource in an Ethics class with 8th graders!

  5. Introduction to Philosophy Course

  6. Student Advisory Course on Drug and Alcohol Abuse 

  7. A Lesson on Truth

  8. A lesson on Appearance and Reality

    Discover More of My Philosophy in the Classroom Series