1.3.24

Explore Greek & Roman Gods: Ares vs Mars - Mythology, Love, and War Insights

Dive into the fascinating world of Greek and Roman mythology with a detailed comparison between Ares and Mars. Discover their myths, lovers, and roles in ancient tales.

Hey, y’all. I’m in the Louvre Museum. Here stands Mars (or Ares to the Greeks), the deity of war, embodying cries, battles, bloodshed, and military conquest. It feels like the Romans admired him significantly, and although the Greeks certainly gave him a place of honor on Olympus, he wasn’t as much worshipped in temples as he was respected and feared. His lover was famously Aphrodite — the goddess of love. Also, in the spirit of exploring the less discussed side of history, we get to see his representation from behind. Additionally, if you’ve ever seen Ridley Scott’s ‘Prometheus’ — the prequel to the Alien movies — does the god’s face remind you of the giant humanoids from the film? And, if you’re a Percy Jackson fan, Ares plays a supporting role in the plot of the first book.

Citation:
Louvre Museum. "Arès Borghèse." Louvre Collections, https://collections.louvre.fr/ark:/53355/cl010279164
PDF Copy for Printing

14.2.24

Valentine, Christian Martyr and Saint — Resources for the Middle and High School Humanities and English Language Arts Classroom

Hey, y'all. I feel like Valentine's Day is such an ingrained part of American school life; however, few of us know the actual, legendary story. So—let's rectify that with a true-to-the-source resource on Valentine, a Christian martyr from Rome in the Third Century. Let's go!


You'll love this historically-based resource detailing the mystery surrounding Valentine the Saint and Valentine's Day. Download it here from my TpT store.

Happy Valentine's Day! I'm thrilled to share my latest educational adventure with you! We're diving into the mysterious world of Saint Valentine, a figure whose story is as fascinating as it is enigmatic. In 1969, the Catholic Church made the intriguing decision to remove Saint Valentine from its liturgical calendar, citing doubts about his true identity. Was there one Valentine, or several figures merging into this legendary name? This captivating question is the cornerstone of our new resource, designed to spark curiosity and critical thinking among students.

What's Inside This Resource?
  • Print and Digital Access: Get your hands on both PDF and Google Workspace formats, plus Easel integration.
  • Three-Day Lesson Plan: Complete with insightful teacher's notes.
  • Key Characters and Places Anchor Chart: Situate Valentine in his ancient Roman milieu of the 3rd century.
  • Reading Cards: Dive into the 'Lives of the Saints' and a detailed dictionary entry on Saint Valentine, each enriched with art and literary connections.
  • Note-taking Template & 16-Question Bank: Tailored for both teachers and students.
  • Exit Ticket: A crucial tool for assessing student understanding and a foundation for research and writing assignments.
  • Frayer Model Vocabulary Template: Engage students visually and creatively in understanding vocabulary.
  • Research Paper Prompt: Encourage students to explore the historical depths of Saint Valentine's life and legends.
  • Further Reading List: Far from just a bibliography, this is a treasure trove for deeper exploration and student projects.

Designed for middle and high schoolers, this resource fits seamlessly into thematic lessons around Saint Valentine's Day in English Language Arts and Humanities classes.


Even More Love for Your Lessons:

  1. Three Myths of Lovers
  2. Tales of Love and Discord
  3. Pygmalion and Galatea

Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Higher Education, Adult Education, Homeschooler, Not Grade Specific - TeachersPayTeachers.com
Find teacher-related resources
on the Stones of Erasmus TpT Store.

For full access to this resource and more, navigate to my website, Stones of Erasmus. Let's explore the heart of history together!




PDF Copy for Printing

31.1.24

Rediscovering "Bélizaire and the Frey Children": A Tale of Resilience in Southern Art

Hey, y’all. I’m in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in the American Wing. Y’all — it’s a moment of rediscovery for this New Orleanian! I’m standing before the once-lost-now-found “Bélizaire and the Frey Children,” a significant artwork that was hidden in the New Orleans Museum of Art’s storage for ages.

🎨 Painted circa 1837 by Jacques Guillaume Lucien Amans, this portrait captures an upper-class New Orleans family before the Civil War and includes Bélizaire, an enslaved Afro-Creole teenager — he was perhaps fifteen year’s old. What’s truly remarkable is Bélizaire’s inclusion in the Frey family portrait — a rare depiction of a person of color in Southern art of that era.
The painting’s history is as haunting as it is fascinating. After the Spanish flu struck, tragically claiming the lives of the three Frey children, Bélizaire’s image was deliberately erased from the painting, likely by a Frey family member. Yet, his presence lingered like a ghostly outline, defying his erasure.
🔍 Thanks to the efforts of historian Katy Morlas Shannon and art collector Jeremy K. Simien, Bélizaire’s story has been uncovered and his image restored. This painting not only offers a glimpse into the complex world of 19th-century New Orleans but also symbolizes resilience against historical erasure.
🖼️ “Bélizaire and the Frey Children” stands as a testament to our complicated history and the enduring spirit of those who were once overlooked. It’s a haunting yet beautiful reminder of our past.

19.1.24

Eulogy for Anthony Greig Roselli, Sr. (1950-2024)

Remembering Anthony Roselli: a heartfelt tribute, written by his middle son, Anthony Greig Roselli, Jr., to a life woven with New Orleans' spirit, culinary passion, and memorable adventures.

Eulogy

[Greig]: I'd like to share a few thoughts that I penned down in the parking lot. [laughter]

Anthony Greig Roselli, Sr.
Dad in the 1970s.
Anthony Roselli, a man whose spirit mirrored the vibrancy and resilience of the city he loved. In the past days, driving from Frostop to Airline Motors, I was struck by the transformations — y’all, Airline Motors is now a local branch of the New Orleans fairgrounds; that’s depressing. Can y’all believe that?

I found myself on the levee by the Mississippi River. Pam, remember when I brought you that piece of driftwood from there? The last time I saw my father was in February 2022.

I've only recently come to fully appreciate his impact. A woman on Facebook recalled seeing him regularly at Russell's, expressing her sorrow upon hearing of his passing. He touched lives, often without us even realizing it. At 73, he relished life's simple pleasures and profound depths, especially the culinary delights of New Orleans. From the bustling tables of Russell's Marina Grill to R&O's Restaurant, he was a connoisseur of our city’s flavors.

Like my younger brother Nicholas said, our knowledge of New Orleans cuisine stems from him. From high-end restaurants to the humble Waffle House, he found joy in them all. It seems silly to be moved by memories of Waffle House, but they’re part of the rich tapestry of his life.

My father’s life was a blend of deep roots in New Orleans and adventurous escapades. From humorous run-ins with the Causeway Police to mistaken identity mix-ups during my European student visa application — I’m “Anthony Greig Roselli, Junior, not Senior,” I said. Several altercations during Dad's single nights led to his imprisonment in the Parish jail. I'll let you connect the dots...

Dad certainly brought interesting moments! Despite the distance when I lived in Europe, his calls and texts, often oblivious to time zones, kept us connected. “Dad, it's 3 AM here!” we'd laugh.

His Italian-American heritage infused him with a zest for life, bringing joy to all who knew him. His presence was felt everywhere, from Coffee's Boiling Pot in Madisonville, where I worked as a busboy, where he'd lovingly pester me for refills, to the St. Tammany Parish Public Library, where I also worked after school, he'd proudly announce to everyone in the quiet periodicals section, “I’m searching for my book-shelving son.”

His unwavering support for Nicholas Adam, Brad Michael, and myself was constant. Also, his close relationship with his older sister of nine years — Carol Roselli Fallo.

One of my fondest memories involves his friend Jane LaBarre. Dad took us to City Park, where we met Jane for the first time. I’m sure she thought we were feral cats. And what an adventure that turned out to be — including a daredevil escape from the train ride, much to the ‘amusement’ of everyone, including the police later searching for a "Caucasian male."
My father and I fishing at
Percy Quin State Park (circa 1984).

Dad had a way of turning moments into memories, often accompanied by laughter. But the song 'Cats in the Cradle' – it’s a song that now holds a deeper meaning for me.
And the cat's in the cradle and the silver spoon / Little boy blue and the man in the moon / ‘When you coming home, dad/son?’ ‘I don't know when / But we'll get together then / You know we'll have a good time then.’
[tears]

I was the son who moved away and did my own thing, which I believe was my father's gift to me, albeit a sad yet beautiful one. 

As we bid farewell to Anthony, let's celebrate his life not just with tears but with gratitude. He leaves a legacy in his children, grandchildren — Isabella and Ethan, his beloved family, many cousins, nieces, and nephews, and cherished friends — Susan, Danny, Jerry, Sharon, Michael Arevalo, and many more. His life was a tapestry of joy, love, and laughter, shared generously with all of us.

So, as we gather here, let’s cherish the memories, the laughter, and the love he shared with each of us. Let’s celebrate a life well-lived, a heart well-loved, and a man who will be deeply missed.

Thank you, Dad. We love you, and your spirit will always be with us. Yeah, you right.

[Laughter]

Oh gosh.

N.B.: Dad passed away on Thursday, January 11, 2024. The above eulogy, given on Friday, January 19, 2024, is a text in a slightly modified form. To hear the original eulogy, navigate to SoundCloud, where you can listen to the unvarnished version.

Obituary 
Anthony Greig Roselli, Sr., aged 73, passed away on Thursday, January 11, 2024. Cherished father of Brad Michael Roselli, Anthony Greig Roselli, Jr., and Nicholas Adam Roselli, who is married to Brooke B. Roselli. Beloved best friend of Jane LaBarre and her son Michael Arevalo. He was a devoted brother to Carol R. Fallo, a loving grandfather to Isabella and Ethan, and an uncle to many nieces and nephews. He was a proud retiree from the Shell Oil Company. Anthony will be fondly remembered for the warm friendships he nurtured at Russell's Marina Grill and Dixie Chicken and Ribs, where he was always greeted with open arms. Family, friends, and those who were touched by Anthony's life are warmly invited to join in commemorating his life. The funeral service will be held at Leitz-Eagan Funeral Home on Friday, January 19, 2024, from 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm. To share memories or condolences, please visit Leitz-Eagan Funeral Home.

5.1.24

Things in My Type ‘B’ Classroom that just Makes Sense

Welcome to 'Things in My Type ‘B’ Classroom that Just Makes Sense,' a unique exploration of the unconventional yet harmonious world of a Type B classroom. In this post, we delve into the charmingly unorganized library, the intriguing 'Random Bowls,' and the essential first aid kit, each element artfully contributing to the distinctiveness of our learning environment. 
Discover how these seemingly haphazard items are not merely decorative but integral to our educational fabric, fostering an atmosphere of discovery and engagement. Join us as we celebrate the eclectic and purposeful arrangement that defines the spirit of a Type B classroom, where every item has a story and every corner a lesson.

In my Type Two classroom, a charmingly unorganized library coexists with a ‘Random Bowl’ and a first aid kit, nestled beside another ‘Random Bowl.’ Each element, though appearing haphazard, subtly underscores the distinctiveness of a Type B classroom. Here, an assorted collection of items isn’t just decorative; they’re integral, seamlessly weaving into the fabric of our learning space. This arrangement fosters an atmosphere where eclectic, unconventional elements find harmony and purpose, enhancing the sense of discovery and engagement in our educational journey.

29.12.23

Personal Revelation: Happy Birthday Post (To Me!)

Today is my birthday. I will not reveal my age because you could do a quick Google search and figure it out for yourself. However, I feel young-ish. Happy birthday to me!

Greig Roselli is a happy egg.
I won't reveal when this photograph was taken.
---

🌱 Have you ever caught yourself apologizing for simply being who you are? Today, I had a powerful realization: I often say sorry when I'm my most authentic self. It's as if there's a part of me that wants to "correct" my behavior, to put me back in the "proper" place.

🔗 Why? Because that's how I was raised. Growing up, I was told—either explicitly or implicitly—that being "me" wasn't always acceptable. That showing my true colors was somehow a disruption, something to be muted or hidden away. 

🎭 We carry these learned behaviors into adulthood without even realizing it. They become automatic, a reflex. But the question is, why should we have to apologize for being authentic? Why should we dampen our own light?

🤔 It's time to break the cycle. Instead of apologizing for who I am, I'm choosing to embrace myself fully—quirks, idiosyncrasies, and all. After all, it's those very characteristics that make each of us unique, valuable, and irreplaceable.

✨ So if you've ever felt the need to apologize for being yourself, remember that you're not alone. But let's make a pact right now to stop saying sorry for being the amazing individuals we are. Because authenticity is something to celebrate, not apologize for.


28.12.23

Exploring Jackson Pollock's 'Number 50': A Journey into Drip Painting and Abstract Expressionism

Let's talk about Jackson Pollock's 'Number 50'. Dive into the world of action painting, a subset of Abstract Expressionism, developed mid-century by Pollock, where he set out to explore a blend of chance and precision in abstract art.

🎨🖌️ Dive into the dynamic world of Jackson Pollock’s ‘Number 50’, a 1950 masterpiece of drip painting. This piece is not just paint on canvas; it’s an iconic example of action art and abstract expressionism. 💫🌌


Pollock’s method? Using house paint and a stick to let each drip and swirl take its own course, creating a symphony of controlled chaos. But how much control did Pollock really have? 🤔🎨 Each splatter and line raises questions about artistic intent versus randomness.
Reflect on the nature of art itself: the choice of colors, the angle of the drip, and the artist’s movement around the canvas. It’s a dance of chance and precision. 🕺💃
Ever written about art and received unexpected feedback? Share your experiences and thoughts on this captivating form of expression. Let’s delve into the depths of drip painting together! 🤓✍️