9.2.21

Digital Teacher Tools: Use Google Forms With a Lesson On Plato's Allegory of the Cave

Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Higher Education, Adult Education, Homeschooler, Not Grade Specific - TeachersPayTeachers.comTeaching Plato's Allegory of the Cave, use our assessment tool to evaluate students' understanding of Plato's theory of realityI was inspired to create this Google Forms resource when I noticed the popularity of my retelling of Plato's storyIn this story, Plato imagines a world where one man wakes up and questions what is real and what is not real. Have your students read this story with you and use my handy dandy comprehension questions and discussion activities to lead your students into an examination of Plato's metaphysical thinking.

Download on TpT, Made by Teachers, and Amazon


This resource is optimized for distance learning. The product includes THREE Google Forms links. Modify this resource for use on Google Classroom and other classroom management sites.


This resource includes the following features:

Essential Question: What is the gist of Plato's Allegory of the Cave?

  • The text of the story is Plato's Allegory of the Cave (Republic VII.514a-520a) 
    • The story is retold from the source material in easy-to-understand English. Great for a class read-and-share. Or, have students pair-read the text and then have a whole-class discussion.
  • THREE Google Forms Assessments
    • Multiple Choice Assessment
      • 5 Multiple Choice Questions
      • Student Self-Reflection Survey
    • Matching Assessment
      • 10 Matching Items
      • 2 Multiple Choice Questions
      • Student Self-Reflection Survey
    • Written Assessment
      • 5 Short Answer Questions
      • 2 Long Answer Questions
      • Student Self-Reflection Survey
  • Bibliography
    • Included is a shortlist of resources related to Plato's Allegory for both teachers and students.

Why Use Google Forms in a Classroom?

Google Forms allows teachers to collect information about students' learning. Google Forms are editable. You can fit these Google Forms assessment to your specific needs. You can modify, delete, or even edit questions. You can also change the points value for the assessment. Also, from a data-collection point of view, Google Forms give teachers a bird's-eye-view of student achievement — you can organize assessment results into amazing charts and graphs. You will then be able to identify what specifically students know and don't know.

Discover More of My Philosophy in the Classroom Series 

6.2.21

Teach Plato’s Allegory of the Cave with a Digital Educational Download from Stones of Erasmus

Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Higher Education, Adult Education, Homeschooler, Not Grade Specific - TeachersPayTeachers.com

If you want to teach philosophy to young people, start with some of Plato's myths, as recounted in his book The Republic. The most potent myth from Plato is the Allegory of the Cave. It's such a vivid metaphor for illustrating a specific type of search for truth  that your students will get it right away and not only enjoy reading the source material with you, but they'll surprise you with their takes on the narratives and connections to the real world.

Plato's Allegory of the Cave Digital Download
Download the digital resource on TpT, Amazon, or Made By Teachers!


If you want to teach philosophy to young people, use this lesson plan that introduces students to Plato’s theory of reality. I was inspired to create this resource when I retold the story of Plato’s Allegory of the Cave (from The Republic) in plain languageIn this story, Plato imagines a world where one man wakes up and questions what is real and not real. Have your students read this story with you, and use my handy dandy comprehension questions and discussion activities to lead your students to examine Plato’s metaphysical thinking. 

*This resource is optimized for distance learning. The product includes an editable Google Docs link. Modify this resource for use on Google Classroom and other classroom management sites*

This resource includes the following features:

Essential Question: How do I know what is really real?

  • The text of the story is included in this resource.

  • The story is retold from the source material in easy-to-understand English. Great for a class read-and-share. Or, have students pair-read the text and then have a whole-class discussion.

  • 15 reading comprehension questions

  • Useful for homework. To flip the classroom — assign the reading before you plan to discuss and have students complete the reading comprehension questions beforehand.

  • 6 Discussion Questions

  • Perfect for group work or a carousel activity — get your kids moving while discussing Plato!

  • 1 Chart to Explain Plato’s Two-World Theory 

  • Useful graphic organizer to understand Plato’s worldview

  • An answer key for both comprehension and discussion questions

  • Suggested Lesson Plan 

  • With more ideas and instructions on how to use this resource

  • Bibliography

  • I use the bibliography as a further reading resource for my students. Assign your curious scholars a research assignment or have students do projects based on books, links, and other material related to Plato they may find interesting or exciting.

Suggested Uses:

  1. Humanities Course on Ancient Greece

  2. World History Course on the History of Ideas 

  3. Literature Course

  4. Ethics Course — See how I used this resource in an Ethics class with 8th graders!

  5. Introduction to Philosophy Course

  6. Student Advisory Course on Drug and Alcohol Abuse 

  7. A Lesson on Truth

  8. A lesson on Appearance and Reality

    Discover More of My Philosophy in the Classroom Series 

    That Time My Mother Mailed Me a Mardi Gras King Cake from New Orleans

    King Cake from Gambino's Bakery in New Orleans
    Fedex delivered a king cake in a box
    from Gambino's Bakery in New Orleans.

    Unfrosted King Cake from Gambino's Bakery
    King Cake Before Its Frosted
    With Green, Purple, and Gold
    Today, Mom sent a king 👑 cake to me from @gambinosbakery in New Orleans. @ceiacrema helped me to open and decorate! Who’s ready for a king cake party? And who’s gonna get the baby? As a kid, we used to have Mardi Gras classroom parties. Think a colossal sheet cake from @winndixie covered in purple, green, and gold, and your entire first-grade class goes into a diabetic coma. Thankfully teachers knew to save the cake as a Friday thing (at the end of the day). Otherwise, nobody was learning anything. I know it’s a crazy year to celebrate 🎉 , but it’s Mardi Gras season y’all. Be safe, stay masked, and do your part to stop the spread of Covid-19. But that doesn’t mean you can’t have a slice, honey.

    30.1.21

    FREEBIE! 3-Box Note-Taking Template from Stones of Erasmus

    Use Google Apps in the Classroom? Do you need a note-taking template for students? Look no further.
    3-Box Note-taking Template

    Go Digital With a Note-Taking Template Compatible with Google Apps

    Going digital, I often bemoan that students do not always have clear ideas on how to take notes whilst on Zoom. Suffice it to say, no one is using a notebook anymore. So I came up with something old and borrowed and traditional and put it into a zesty digital format.

    Here is a freebie for y'all to share with your students. It's a simple-to-use digital note-taking template.

    Questions:

    In this section, students can do one of two things (or both). First, they can record questions they have so they won't forget. Second, they can generate test-type questions. Studies show when students start thinking like the teacher, they are more likely to do well on tests and other assessments.

    Notes:

    In this section, students jot down what they hear in class in the normal way. I don't expect students to take down everything I say. The gist is what I'm after.

    Summary:

    At the end of class, or for independent work, students take time to digest what was learned in class and write down everything in a summative paragraph form. Great for retention! Also, if you prefer the old school method, I got you. Once you download the template, you'll see there are both versions available, print and digital.

    You can download the FREEBIE on my TpT store OR you can click the link below!

    PDF Copy of FREEBIE!

    18.1.21

    January 18th is a National Holiday: Martin Luther King, Jr. On Poverty

    In this post, I talk about how Martin Luther King, Jr. is known as a civil rights activist. Still, his legacy is more about human rights -- especially the state of poverty that he believed could be eradicated if humans only have the will to do so.
    Martin Luther King, Jr. at a press conference
     "Martin Luther King press conference / [MST]." Original black and white negative by Marion S. Trikosko. Taken August 26th, 1964, Washington, D.C, United States (@libraryofcongress). Colorized by Jordan J. Lloyd. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA https://www.loc.gov/item/2003688129/

    King was the president of the Southern 
    Christian Leadership Conference and advocated
    for the eradication of poverty in society.
    image courtesy NYPL on Unsplash

    Today I listened to a brief speech given by Martin Luther King, Jr.'s son, Martin Luther King, III. In the video, he talks about his father's legacy but points out that one message King repeatedly gave was often not emphasized in the praise we often give the slain civil rights leader. It's about poverty. When King was assassinated in Memphis on April 4, 1968, he protested against the poverty wages sanitation workers were given who worked in the city. Workers worked long hours and subsisted on low wages, and many were also on welfare. King espouses the merits of having a stable job and receiving an equitable income as something elusive for Americans. Whenever I talk about living wages today or about the need to reduce poverty, I often run up against tin ears. It's easy to shush away poverty as one of those problems Miss America pageant contestants say they want to defeat (along with world peace). But King was right when he said the problem won't go away unless we have the will to fight it. When I look at the problems beset by the Covid-19 virus, I see a public health crisis, but I also see a crisis that has torn open the inequalities caused by poverty. In the United States, forty-five million (maybe more) live in poverty, which by some estimates is more than were poor during Martin Luther King's time.

    So, if you are celebrating the Martin Luther King holiday today in the United States, it is appropriate to sing praise for what he did to secure civil rights, but the road to equitable human rights is still not won.

    PDF Copy for Printing

    14.1.21

    Aesthetic Thursday: Poussin’s Poetic Painting "Blind Orion Searching for the Rising Sun" at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

    I recently went to the Met — and I wandered the newly renovated European Paintings galleries and I fell in love with the French artist Poussin's painterly image of a wandering giant looking for the sun.
    The painting "Blind Orion Searching for the Rising Sun" is an oil painting on canvas by French artist Nicolas Poussin
    Nicolas Poussin, French Les Andelys 1594-1665 Rom — "Blind Orion Searching for the Rising Sun," 1658 (oil on canvas). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City. 24.45.1 

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art has recently renovated its European Paintings galleries. The skylights have been fixed and apparently more artwork has been hung on the walls. I like to wander the galleries without a goal in mind — however, I lie just a bit, here. Because I did have a goal in my wanderings — mainly to find the Met's Caravaggio's. But it's always the serendipitous finds that stick with me. And Poussin's "Blind Orion" caught my attention. I know nothing of Poussin — so my interpretation of the painting is more of a first blush. But I am a lover of myth and poetry — and this painting draws you into a mythological world. At first I thought the giant figure carrying a man on his shoulders was Saint Christopher — the legendary boatsman who carried the Christ child on his shoulder crossing a river. But that is not the subject of this painting. It's a depiction of the blind giant Orion, who carries his guide Cedalion, as they look for the rising sun. The museum placard indicates that Diana, the moon goddess, who appears a diaphanous blue, stands watching in the clouds. It's a magical story; obviously one fit for myth — but the scene resonates with me because I think of myself as somewhat of a wanderer. And Orion is also the name of one of my favorite constellations. So it is befitting. Here's to searching. For the healing sun.

    PDF for Printing